• Professor
    Department Chair
  • Department of Mathematics
  • Temple University

Irina Mitrea is a Harmonic Analyst working at the interface of this field with Partial Differential Equations, Scattering Theory, Geometric Measure Theory, Several Complex Variables, and Validated Numerics. With a publication record to date of 42 journal articles and three research monographs (two published and one in press), her research is rooted in the study of well-posedness of boundary value problems for elliptic systems of second and higher order in domains with irregular boundaries. Among other things, Mitrea's extensive work on multi-layer potentials associated with higher order elliptic operators lays, for the first time in the mathematical literature, the foundation for the systematic treatment of boundary value problems associated with higher order operators in non-smooth domains via singular integral operators. Her theoretical work combined with her innovative collaboration with experts in Validated Numerics extended the understanding of the Spectral Radius Conjecture for double layer potentials associated with second order operators in non-smooth domains. Mitrea has been selected in the Class of 2015 of Fellows of the American Mathematical Society (AMS) and her research record earned her a Von Neumann Fellowship at the Institute for Advanced Study, Princeton, in 2014, and the Ruth Michler Prize from the Association of Women in Mathematics in 2008. She has been a plenary speaker at numerous national and international conferences including the American Mathematical Society Meeting, University of Kentucky, Lexington, KY, 2010, the International Conference on Harmonic Analysis and PDEs, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, 2004, and the 7 th and 8 th Workshops on Geometric Analysis of PDEs and Several Complex Variables, Serra Negra, Brazil, in 2013 and 2015. Mitrea also has a documented record of exemplary service to the profession, to the AMS, and to the Association for Women in Mathematics. Her outreach activities for women and under-represented groups, served more than 3500 students.